Care Advice

Vetstreet.com is a great website for breed specific health information. Below are their top tips for healthcare and grooming for the Cane Corso. For more information or the original article please visit their site (http://www.vetstreet.com/dogs/cane-corso#upper-tabs).

All credit goes to the original author.


Cane Corso

What You Need to Know About Cane Corso Health

All dogs have the potential to develop genetic health problems, just as all people have the potential to inherit disease. Run from any breeder who does not offer a health guarantee on puppies, who tells you that the breed has no known problems, or isolates puppies from the main part of the household for health reasons. A reputable breeder will be honest and open about health problems in the breed and the regularity with which they occur in her lines. Some of the health conditions that have been seen in the Cane Corso are hip dysplasia, eye problems such as entropion or ectropion, demodectic mange, and a tendency toward gastric torsion.

Ask the breeder to show evidence that a puppy’s parents have hip evaluations of excellent, good, or fair from the Orthopedic Foundation for Animals (OFA) or hip scores from the University of Pennsylvania (PennHIP) as well as eye clearances from the Canine Eye Registry Foundation. Do not purchase a puppy from a breeder who cannot provide you with written documentation that the parents were cleared of health problems that affect the breed. Having the dogs "vet checked" is not a substitute for genetic health testing.

Remember that after you’ve taken a new puppy into your home, you have the power to protect him from one of the most common health problems: obesity. Keeping a Cane Corso at an appropriate weight is one of the easiest ways to extend his life. Make the most of your preventive abilities to help ensure a healthier dog for life.

The Basics of Cane Corso Grooming

Grooming the Cane Corso is quite easy due to his short coat, though his large size means it’s a big job. Brush his sleek coat with a natural bristle brush or mitt once a week. Use coat conditioner/polish to brighten the sheen. Bathe him every three months (or when he’s dirty) using a mild shampoo.

The rest is basic care. Check his ears every week and clean if needed. Trim his toenails regularly, usually once a month, and brush his teeth regularly using a soft toothbrush and doggie toothpaste to keep his teeth and gums healthy. It is essential to introduce grooming to the Cane Corso when he is very young so he learns to accept the handling and fuss peacefully

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